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Find 2020 Info on Fishing Seasons & Regulations

New York State and the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) have established statewide freshwater fishing regulations that all fishermen must abide by. While many fishing seasons and limits are the same throughout New York State, fishermen must also remember to check whether a body or water has special fishing regulations as well.

For Lake George, most of the statewide regulations apply. However, there are a few special regulations to be mindful of if you plan to go fishing on the lake. Check out the seasons and regulations for fish found in Lake George below!

split image with a man holding up a fish in each onePhoto credit: Joe Testa, Fresh Water Therapy

New York's Statewide Fishing Regulations:

Black Bass (Largemouth / Smallmouth)

  • 3rd Saturday in June - November 30
  • Minimum Length - 12"
  • Daily Limit - 5
  • December 1 - Friday preceding the 3rd Saturday in June
  • Catch and Release Only
  • Artificial Lures Only

Northern Pike

  • 1st Saturday in May - March 15
  • Minimum Length - 18"
  • Daily Limit - 5

Chain Pickerel

  • 1st Saturday in May - March 15
  • Minimum Length - 15"
  • Daily Limit - 5

Yellow Perch

  • All Year
  • Any Size
  • Daily Limit - 50

Black Crappie

  • All Year
  • Minimum Length - 9"
  • Daily Limit - 25

Brown Bullhead & Rock Bass

  • All Year
  • Any Size
  • No Limit

Pumpkinseed

  • All Year
  • Any Size
  • Daily Limit - 50

Special Lake George Fishing Regulations:

Note: These special regulations apply for Lake George and all tributaries upstream to the first barrier impassable by fish.

Trout

  • All Year
  • Any Size
  • Daily Limit - 5

Lake Trout

  • All Year
  • Minimum Length - 23"
  • Daily Limit - 2

Landlocked Salmon

  • All Year
  • Minimum Length - 18"
  • Daily Limit - 2

Smelt

  • May 16 - March 31
  • Any Size
  • Daily Limit - 25

A Note on Fishing in the Summer

During the hot days of summer anglers should keep in mind that trout and salmon experience serious physical stress when water temperatures get above 70 degrees F. Anglers can help protect the fish population by adhering to the following:

  • Avoid catch and release fishing for heat-stressed trout (they are likely to die from the stress regardless of how carefully they're handled).
  • Don't fish for trout or disturb them when they've gathered in unusually high numbers. It's likely they're recovering from heat stress in a pocked of cold water.
  • Fish early in the morning when stream temperatures are coolest.
  • Have an alternative fishing destination in mind in case the water temperature is too high where you go.
  • Consider fishing at a waterbody that is less prone to heat stress and/or fishing for a more heat-tolerant species, such as smallmouth bass.

See more info in the Fresh Water Fishing Guide »

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